accountability

What #PlaidShirtGuy Can Teach Us About Recruiting and Hiring Best Practices

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Source: Twitter

Tyler Linfesty, better known to the internet as “plaid shirt guy,” became an overnight sensation because of his facial expressions at a Trump rally in Montana. According to the 17-year-old student from Billings, his reactions were a response to comments made by the President.

I’m not writing this to take sides politically; there’s already enough of that going on. What struck me was Linfesty’s choice—he chose not to take what he was hearing at face value. Instead, he listened and when he questioned something he was hearing it showed on his face.

His example is important for all of us who want to improve recruiting and hiring. We shouldn’t take everything we hear or read at face value. This includes news reports, social media posts, and even people in my line of work—speakers and writers.

It’s easy to believe someone who’s been invited to the stage or given space in a trusted publication. Speaking on stage or being featured as a writer elevates that individual’s perceived expertise. Many people listen to what these thought leaders communicate without questioning the applicability of that knowledge for their specific circumstances.

Case in point. I often hear speakers, panelists, and writers offer a best practice, proven method, or industry standard to solve a problem. Then, another thought leader in a different setting offers a different best practice for the exact same problem. Does this mean one of them is being dishonest? No. My experience is that most people are trying to be helpful.

The real issue is that best practices (and phrases that mean the same thing) are relative. From that individual’s perspective, the idea being put forth is what they believe to be the best. It’s up to you to be like #PlaidShirtGuy and question the applicability of that idea for your situation. Here are three ways to do that.

Idea #1
Check the label
Many ideas labeled as a best practice are in the eye of the beholder. Before deciding if it’s best for your organization, check the label.

To do that, I like to ask

Why has this been a best practice for your organization?  

Idea #2
Trust and verify
Trust that the thought leader is trying to be helpful (because most are). Then, verify that the results achieved using that best practice will be worthwhile in your situation.

Ask questions like

What specific results did that best practice achieve?
How long did it take to implement?
How long before you saw those results?
How much did it cost? And what was the ROI?

Idea #3
Validate the source

In the spirit of being helpful, people will offer up brilliant ideas. Ideas that are sometimes not their own and that they themselves have not tried. When this happens, it tends to occur during panel discussions.

To validate the source, try asking

When did your company implement this best practice?

You can learn where the idea came from, allowing you to go to the original source for details.

 

 

 

 

Scott WintripWhat #PlaidShirtGuy Can Teach Us About Recruiting and Hiring Best Practices
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Guilt-Free Leadership

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Morning Morning Message imageLeadership requires taking chances and making on-the-spot decisions. Often, leaders make the right choice. Sometimes, they blunder.

Francis made such a blunder. In rebuilding his recruiting team, he hired not just one, but two people who ended up being bad hires. Making matters worse, several people, including his boss, advised against hiring them.

Filled with guilt, he ruminated over his “stupid” mistake. This triggered the story-telling mechanisms of his brain to make up frightening yarns as to all the negative impacts this would have. Stephen King himself couldn’t have written a better tale of horror.

The good news was this only went on for a few minutes as he realized that shaming himself wasn’t solving the problem. Instead, he did the next right thing, cleaning up the mistake.

We’re all going to screw up. When this happens, we simply must accept our mistakes, fix what we can, learn what we can, and move on. Guilt is optional.

Mistakes will kill you, if you let them. They can murder serenity, decapitate self-confidence, and eviscerate self-esteem. Every mistake is an opportunity to practice guilt-free leadership.

This gives a whole new meaning to “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.”

Scott WintripGuilt-Free Leadership
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Innovative Business Practices

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting done what matters most.

Most people would agree that killing the success of a business with ineffective approaches is a really bad idea. Unfortunately, that’s what’s happening in many companies across the globe. While the use of Repetitive Practices in their businesses may not close the doors, they are hampering the achievement of their tremendous potential.

What is a Repetitive Practice? It is an inefficient method or routine that is often the way things have always been done. Repetitive Practices are all too common and are the cause of or a contributor to most of the challenges faced by companies of all sizes.

How do you spot these? Watch for one or more of the following indicators:

  • A process that achieves less than the intended result.
  • Beloved or institutionally sacred methodologies that people fight to keep, even when these methods have lost their competitive edge.
  • Any routine that is complex, requiring constant reminders of what to do and how to do it.
  • A system, procedure, or course of action that people defend by saying, “But that’s the way it’s always been done.”
  • All ways of doing things that are the same after a maximum of two to three years (business and the market have evolved but processes lag behind).

What happens when you replace the repetitive? One example is an advisory client that improved sales tenfold in just three months. Their Repetitive Practice of Sales Force, a sales process that attempts to control the client, was replaced by the Innovative Practice of Sales Flow, a collaborative way of selling that engages the customer in selling themselves on buying. Sales Flow required them to put in less effort while creating happier buyers, enrolling them in a more satisfying process.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Start replacing Repetitive Practices with Best Practices and Innovative Practices. Download the Business Practices Spectrum today to begin this process.


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Scott WintripInnovative Business Practices
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Stop the Exploding Brains

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting done what matters most.

Cartoon Image

How people learn and how they are taught are often not in sync. This shows up as inconsistencies in execution, untapped market potential, and the need to get “back to basics.” Simply put, if staff consistently did what they are supposed to do in the manner in which they are supposed to do it, execution would improve and results would grow exponentially.

Making matters worse, is the amount of content that is delivered in a relatively short period of time. A daylong or weeklong seminar is the equivalent of unscrewing the top of someone’s head, cramming it full of details, and then reinstalling their skullcap. Is it any wonder that people retain so little and use even less on the job?

Education, done well and done right, is not training. Delivered correctly, it includes the following:

Drip the learning to support retention.
Instead of requiring people to gorge themselves on a buffet of knowledge, give them meal-sized portions of content. Learning Limits, how much content people can digest in one sitting, requires this form or portion control to manage the delivery of ideas, strategies, and best practices.

Countermeasures for the human tendency of making the simple, complex.
Humans are masterful at making things much more complicated than they need to be. To counter this, quality education must promote simplicity, a systematic approach, and methods that are sustainable. These countermeasures mitigate or eliminate our innate foibles, especially when it comes to making mountains out of molehills.

Opportunities to apply what’s been learned.
Practice is said to make perfect. While it’s rare that people achieve anything near sustained perfection at anything, we need more opportunities to try out new skills and behaviors. It’s through repetition that we gain mastery, and trying to master any approach or technique only in conversations and meetings with prospects, clients, and candidates often leads to poor or even disastrous results.

Radical Accountability to counter the momentum of the status quo.
Momentum keeps an object going in the same direction. Since the pull of the status quo is so strong, it takes something even stronger, Radical Accountability, to break the momentum and create a sustainable shift in the opposite direction.

By stopping traditional training and starting real education, you and your organization can create real learning opportunities that benefit all parties, with no more exploding heads.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Begin to employ the four interventions to shift from a training culture to a sustainable learning environment.


Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here: https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

Scott WintripStop the Exploding Brains
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The Advanced Level

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

Many professionals want to be at the advanced level, preferring to take part in processes or education that employ advanced skills. While that’s noble, the advanced level isn’t what most people think.

Advanced selling, leading, recruiting or serving isn’t about learning and doing complex things. Rather, it’s about doing the simple things consistently, persistently, and insistently.

These include:

  • Consistently employing core competencies from start to finish.
  • Persistently engaging in these behaviors in every instance and interaction where they apply.
  • Insistently being responsible and holding others as responsible for honing and perfecting these competencies through practice and application.

The most successful leaders, salespeople, recruiters, and service personnel aren’t typically super smart, super talented, or even super lucky. They are people who do the simple things all of the time. This alone is what distinguishes someone as being advanced at their role.

Operating at an advanced level, when done right, is straightforward. What makes it hard is when people are inconsistent in doing what matters most.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Practice being consistent, persistent, and insistent at the core competencies of your role. While practice rarely makes us perfect, practice does make profits.


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Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here: https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

Scott WintripThe Advanced Level
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Unforgettable Leadership

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Wintrip Consulting Group : Take No PrisonersTake No Prisoners is a free weekly memo from Scott Wintrip that explores how Radical Accountability prospers companies and changes lives. Instead of taking people hostage with outdated, heavy-handed, and ineffective methods of management, measurement, and motivation, Radical Accountability focuses on creating an unwavering responsibility for getting what matters most done.

How often is the leadership of yesterday forgotten today? In at least some instances, it’s probably like the artwork in your home or office.

When’s the last time you really paid attention to your art or decorations? Not just a quick glance, but really taking a moment to appreciate the beauty of a piece or remembering what attracted you to it in the first place. Most people admit that the only time they take notice is when someone asks them where they acquired a particular object OR its significance. Simply put, after a while everything blends in, even things that are especially meaningful to us. This is Artwork Affliction and it’s negatively impacting the work of many leaders.

Smart product manufacturers understand this concept, which is why they change their packaging from time to time. Last year, I remember seeing a Pepsi can that had the colors of a Coca Cola product. Just above the Pepsi label were the words “Great new look. Same great taste.” Did they new packaging work? Well, it got my attention enough to mention it here.

Artwork Affliction happens every day in corporations across the globe, and it’s not only the art that’s being overlooked. Those signs espousing your customer service best practices haven’t been noticed in months. The sales process document that you ask people to keep on their desks is collecting dust. Even the main page of your intranet barely gets a notice even though the content may change from time to time.

Radical Accountability, an unwavering responsibility for getting done what matters most, includes a number of methods that eliminate the need for heavy-handed leadership. Leaders all too often have to remind people to do the very things noted on the wall, sales process document, or computer screen because of Artwork Affliction. When leaders do this in the most positive way, it still can feel like micromanagement even though people haven’t been paying attention.

The cure for Artwork Affliction is relatively simple: change the look, location, or liability. You can alter the design, color, or formatting—the look. Moving the location, just like moving furniture, often recaptures attention. To shift the liability, delegate responsibility to team members for regularly modifying the look or location of key totems of workplace significance.

You’ve worked hard to build a company with processes and systems that drive your business. By avoiding Artwork Affliction, you’ll have your best practices doing what they are supposed to do. Now that’s truly unforgotten leadership.

This Week’s Radical Accountability Activating Action: Pick at least one key process this week and change the look, location, or liability of the supporting systems or documentation.


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Follow me on Twitter! You can find me here: https://twitter.com/ScottWintrip
Every day I provide pithy pieces of advice and wisdom. Join the growing crowd who read these gems every day.

You may subscribe and encourage others to subscribe by clicking here.

Check out my podcast series called Simply Scott on iTunes.

If you’d like to reach me, email: scott@ScottWintrip.com or call my direct line: (727) 502-9182

Visit my web site: https://www.WintripConsultingGroup.com

Scott WintripUnforgettable Leadership
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