All posts tagged: change

Want to hire faster in this new decade? Take these 3 steps

No comments

Much is being written about hiring more quickly and the benefits of a faster process. Unfortunately, people often resist change (even positive change), especially when you try to modify a longstanding way of doing something. This is certainly true in recruiting and hiring. Speeding up the process can be met with intense resistance. Case in point…

At a meeting of a company’s leadership team, Paul thought the idea of fast hiring was “repulsive.” As we discussed how to plan the process, Paul started making passive-aggressive comments. After he said, “What’s next? We’re going to replace our employees with robots, like in that Will Smith movie?” I knew our discussion wasn’t addressing all of his concerns. I asked Paul to explain.

“People aren’t products,” he said angrily. “I can’t believe we’re even discussing such a dehumanizing approach. Picking the right people takes time. Interviews, even if they last all day, are a good investment of our time. We must make sure we’re picking the best people. Besides, good candidates won’t want to be rushed through the process. I’m finding this whole conversation repulsive. I’m sure my team will feel the same way.”           

Instead of trying to convince Paul to change his mind, I decided to let him change it himself.

“Paul, thanks for your honesty. I bet you’re not the only one with concerns about a faster approach.” Two other leaders nodded their heads in agreement. “What would you need to determine if this could work for the company?”

Paul thoughtfully paused before responding, “I’d need to see proof. Absolute proof that this will work for us.”

That led to a conversation about rolling out a faster hiring process on a limited basis to start. Two leaders, who didn’t share Paul’s concerns, agreed to test the process. Choosing a job common to both of their departments, we designed a plan and timeline that could be implemented without interrupting day-to-day business. Two other leaders, including Paul, were designated as auditors, outside observers who would monitor and document the pros and cons as the process was rolled out.

I met again with the leadership team after the beginning of the rollout. The two managers testing the process gave updates, sharing mostly positive news. They had made a few missteps along the way; however, both were upbeat. Both had filled two open jobs and lined up several additional candidates in their pipelines as potential future hires.

During their updates, I watched Paul out of the corner of my eye. He spent the entire time looking down at his notes. He appeared angry, even angrier than when he shared his concerns in our first meeting. I learned why when it was Paul’s turn to share pros and cons as an auditor of the test.

“I hate being wrong,” he said. “But, there it is. I was flat out wrong. There was nothing dehumanizing about a faster approach. If anything, it enabled interviewers to focus on people, not process. This shorter, simpler process allowed them to get to know each other better. Our new hires told me they loved our efficient process, and that it was a factor in choosing to work here.”

When recruiting and hiring, speed and accuracy are not mutually exclusive. Nor are speed and intimacy. A well-designed, well-executed recruiting and hiring process allows people to be fully present and have conversations that matter. These interactions build trust as candidates learn they are dealing with confident professionals, and hiring managers discover which candidates are ready to make a job change. This trust becomes the foundation for the employment relationship, one built on a professionally intimate and efficient hiring experience.

To help navigate through resistance as you work to speed up hiring in your organization, take these 3 steps:

Step1
Support people in changing their own mind

Trying to convince someone to see things differently is hard, sometimes impossible. Instead, let him or her do the heavy lifting. Ask a question like I did of Paul: What would you need to determine if faster hiring could work for your team? Integrate the responses into additional questions until you understand the root of the resistance and what will make it go away.

Step 2
Suggest a limited approach

Resistance isn’t always about the change itself. There are times when people want to change but are fearful of the overwhelm it may cause. A limited scope can help. Start with one role; run a short-term test; bring in outside help to lighten the load. By working together, you can drive forward a faster hiring process without driving people crazy with overwhelm and fear.

Step 3
Take the easy way out

Often the path of least resistance is in picking the right person. Seek out an early adopter in your organization, someone who’s known for being first in line to implement new ideas. Work together to plan and execute the rollout. Make adjustments as you learn what works and what does not. Once the speedier process is in place and producing positive results, ask your early adopter to share their experience with others. Nothing enrolls doubters faster than proof positive.

This new decade should include addressing the most vital part of your organization—its people. Having the right people, doing the right things, right when you need them is integral to your organization’s success. That’s why hiring quality people faster than ever is so important. Just don’t go it alone and avoid doing all the heavy lifting by taking the 3 suggested steps. Effective hiring is a team sport. Speeding up hiring requires a team effort.

Scott WintripWant to hire faster in this new decade? Take these 3 steps
read more

Leading Change: How to Go from Being an A-hole to an A-Player

1 comment

podcast-sleeveEvery leader has to drive some type of change from time to time. Because changing things makes people uncomfortable, it’s common that leaders are viewed negatively, even when whatever is being changed is in the best interest of everyone. In this podcast, I walk you through three simple change management steps. By following these, you’ll no longer be seen as an “a-hole” and instead be viewed as an A-player by the very people impacted by change.

Scott WintripLeading Change: How to Go from Being an A-hole to an A-Player
read more

5 Common Sense Changes for How You Hire

No comments

It’s been said that common sense isn’t all that common. I was recently reminded of this in a disturbing way.

The people who run Tampa International Airport have installed an innovative device in their bathrooms. It’s called The Pouch. I could immediately see its usefulness. Putting a backpack, briefcase, or other small carryon in this device will keep it clean and dry.

I noticed a sticker affixed to The Pouch. It pictured a baby with the universal “don’t do this” symbol on it. Seriously? People need to be told not to put a baby in there? Does this mean someone actually tried it? Yikes! While this an extreme example, it once again showed me that people don’t always make decisions rooted in common sense.

Common sense is often lacking in many areas of life and work. One is hiring. I frequently observe organizations engaging in hiring practices that defy common sense. Does this mean that the leaders who engage in the methods are bad people? Maybe even dumb? No. Of course not.

The issue is that habits often interfere with our innate instincts. The very instincts that are at the core of common sense decision-making. We get so used to doing something a certain way, we don’t see that there’s an alternative. Frequently, it takes someone pointing out that there’s a better way. Here are five of my most frequently shared common sense hiring ideas I’m sharing with leaders.

Common Sense Change #1:

Recruit ahead instead of react to an open job

Change is inevitable, including that people will change jobs. Your best employees could leave today, tomorrow, or next week. No matter how loyal you believe them to be. Given the immediate, negative impacts of an open job, it no longer makes sense to wait until a job opens to fill it. In today fast-paced world, common sense dictates that you must line up talent before you need it.

Common Sense Change #2:

Make hiring decisions based upon facts instead of feelings

Most people understand that feelings aren’t facts. Yet, they allow their gut feelings, such as liking someone, to dictate who they hire. Sure, liking a candidate is a good thing. But likeability isn’t proof that someone fits a job. Common sense selection requires having a list of clear criteria that help you pick the right people regardless of what your feelings are telling you.

Common Sense Change #3:

Rely on multiple streams of talent instead of a singular trusted resource

Ask leaders if one resource, such as a job board or referrals, can be relied upon to fill every open job every single time. Most of these leaders will acknowledge it’s dangerous to put all of your eggs in that one basket. However, watch many of these same leaders in action, and you’ll observe contradictory behavior. They rely on that one resource to the exclusion of everything else. Here’s habit in action, trumping common sense. Filling jobs quickly with high-quality talent requires tapping into more than one talent stream.

Common Sense Change #4:

Have candidates show instead of tell

Conventional job interviews are an inaccurate way of determining fit. Why? Both the jobseeker and hiring manager are putting their best selves forward. This gives each party a narrow view of reality. It should be no surprise that many hires fail, given that a decision was made based upon limited information. The common sense way to interview is to seek proof of fit. Having candidates show you they can do the job allows you to experience them in action, while they get to try on the job for size.

Common Sense Change #5:

Change one thing at a time instead of everything at once

How many times have you tried to change many things all at once? I’m betting that didn’t turn out well. Fast change doesn’t stick. It takes time to adjust your routines and change your hiring habits. A rapid series of changes will overwhelm you. When your sense of being overwhelmed reaches a tipping point, you’ll give up and revert back to your previous routine. Better to change one thing at a time and have it stick, than rush the process and have to start all over again.

Access to your common sense is immediately available any time you need it. You just have to get out of your own way. The beauty is the inherent simplicity that comes with it. Common sense solutions are the easiest to employ, once you realize the only thing standing in their way is you.

Scott Wintrip5 Common Sense Changes for How You Hire
read more

Paving the Way for Your Team

No comments

Morning Morning MessageWhere there’s a will there’s a way. Your job, as a leader, is to pave the way. 

People often have good intentions. They intend to source more candidates, make more calls, or hire faster.

Intentions alone frequently end in things staying the same.

A desire to change is never enough. That’s why companies have leaders. A leader’s job is to marry intentions with execution.

It’s been said that “the road to hell is paved with good intentions.”” If that’s true, then the road to heavenly success is grounded in leadership that drives consistent action.

Scott WintripPaving the Way for Your Team
read more

Count the Change to Make the Change Count

No comments

Scott's Monday Morning MessageIf you want something different, you must do something different. Even if you want things to stay the same, change is still required. Everything evolves, including the economic climate, needs of colleagues and constituents, the competitive landscape, and the momentum caused by constantly shifting trends. The status quo, if that is truly a desirable state, requires us to make adjustments as the world continually adjusts around us.

What happens when you you don’t change as life evolves? You end up convincing yourself you don’t need to adapt, as did the Obama administration in their belief that the Cold War was permanently over. As Russia has heated things up with its actions and rhetoric, Washington finds itself unplugged from any meaningful power to change the outcome in Crimea. Another is the example set by General Motors, whose turnaround took an about face with the scandal involving defective ignition switches. GM’s failure to drive organizational change that adequately anticipated and addressed problems has put the company back on its heels versus continuing to sprint ahead.

Change is a catalyst for better results only when three elements are present: knowledge, action, and assessment. Without current knowledge, especially innovative practices, results are poor while labor intensity tends to be high. When action is missing, there are no worthwhile results. Without assessment, outcomes tend to be highly erratic as actions and knowledge are applied through guesswork instead of an accurate understanding of the variables.

Benjamin Franklin is credited with saying “watch the pennies and the dollars will take care of themselves.” In business, leaders must count the organizational change to ensure that adaptations are happening, in the right direction, for the right reasons. Otherwise, their companies end up with “chump change” on the bottom line.

Change That Counts

Scott WintripCount the Change to Make the Change Count
read more

When the Student is Ready, the Teacher is Already There

No comments

Resistance to change is as common and universal as the desire to be loved. Humans are creatures of habit, often perpetuating choices that are not as healthy or productive as other available options. From food to work styles to prioritization, there are frequently better ways to do the things we do.

Herein lies the problem – you most likely don’t have the time, energy, or even the interest to change or improve every aspect of your work and life. Nor should you. Better does not always mean worth it. Some changes, while technically an improvement, are so negligible that there is very little return on the investment of the time spent to achieve that better state.

So, how do you know when striving for betterment is worth the effort? Just watch for the red lights. It’s similar to having picked the wrong road in town on your way to an important meeting. You know you’ve not chosen the best route when every block or two you get stopped as the light turns red. When you arrive late for your meeting, you vow to pick a different way to go next time to avoid the struggle.

Struggles in work and personal life are much like those persistent red lights; they’re telling you to go a different way. Like a wise teacher just waiting to show you a simpler solution, a pattern of obstacles or challenges is your indicator that an opportunity exists to do things in a more effective manner. Your task is to learn what the current circumstances can teach you and what other options are available to achieve the results you desire. You’ll know when you’ve picked the simpler, easier way as you sail through your own version of green light after green light on the path you are traveling.

Scott WintripWhen the Student is Ready, the Teacher is Already There
read more