All posts tagged: job search

Get Jobseekers to Help You Speed Up Hiring

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Quickening the pace of hiring remains a hot topic and rightly so. The time it takes to fill a job grows year after year.

Many ideas on faster hiring are focused on the employer. But what about jobseekers? Sustainable speed can only be achieved if both sides of the hiring equation are addressed.

Here are 4 things jobseekers can do (and you can suggest they do) that increase hiring speed and improve selection accuracy.

Eliminate misinformation
Recurring media reports from a variety of sources indicate that two-thirds or more of resumes contain misinformation. This frequent inaccuracy has elicited a knee-jerk response by companies—it’s assumed that resumes have exaggerations or flat-out lies and that these lies continue during interviews. To manage this, companies slow down the process and dive deep to find these erroneous details. Instead of hiring being built on trust, it’s a tedious process filled with suspicion and doubt.

Combat this misinformation head on. Inform jobseekers that you’re not seeking perfect people, but people who perfectly represent themselves on paper and in conversations. Share examples of how you’ve hired less than perfect people and helped them advance their careers. Make your company a place where potential hires can be safely transparent.

Avoid spraying and praying
Like a farmer spreading manure to fertilize plants, many job candidates are spraying their resumes far and wide, praying one will take root and land them an opportunity. Employers end up buried in a pile of resumes, many of which are a crappy fit (pun intended). Sorting through this takes time, and time kills making good hires. Especially when a talented person, who was at the bottom of the pile, is snapped up by a faster competitor.

Encourage jobseekers to take a more targeted approach to their search. Start by setting and communicating boundaries early. For example, in the content on your job opportunities landing page make it clear that you’ll only consider and respond to candidates who match required qualifications. Repeatedly reinforce and re-communicate this boundary. Popular places for doing so are on the page where candidates enter work history and just above the final “Submit” button for their application.

Offer proof instead of promises
Talk is cheap, especially when answering questions during interviews. Answering an interviewer’s questions may create a feel good moment, but these answers offer nothing in the way of proof of fit. That’s why so many good interviews turn into bad hires. Candidates talk themselves into the role, one that wasn’t a fit after all.

Have each candidate offer proof in place of promises that he or she will fit in. Instead of letting a candidate tell you how she’d solve a problem, have her show you in a role play. Rather than asking about his top skills, have him demonstrate those skills by performing sample work. Require the candidate to go beyond sharing stories of how she works well with others and let her show you how she’ll collaborate with your current team. Showing, instead of telling, provides proof for making an informed decision.

Make better choices
Searching for a job is an emotional experience. Too often feelings trump facts, prompting the jobseeker to accept a role because if feels right versus doing so because it is truly the right fit.

Teach jobseekers how to make decisions rooted in facts instead of feelings. One approach is to ask the candidate to make a list of dealmakers (must-haves) and dealbreakers (must-not haves) and send it to you for discussion during a phone interview. Compare the list to the job and your company. Let people know where things match up and where they don’t. With eyes wide open, you both get to make an informed choice of whether to move forward or not.

Helping jobseekers should be a top priority for everyone involved in hiring. Putting people to work is one way. Guiding them in how they seek work is another. Seize every opportunity you can to inform and educate jobseekers about their role in increasing speed and improving accuracy during the hiring experience. Your role in hiring gives you a unique opportunity to exert your influence beyond just filling the next job. Use that influence to make jobseekers better at their part of the hiring process. You’ll be giving them a gift that serves them the remainder of their careers.

Scott WintripGet Jobseekers to Help You Speed Up Hiring
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Managing the Ups and Downs During a Job Search

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In life, there are certain times when we’re more likely to experience emotional ups and downs. Dating is one. Being a parent of child who’s headed off to college is another. And a job search certainly falls into this category too. Here’s how to effectively manage the ups and downs of a job search.

Scott WintripManaging the Ups and Downs During a Job Search
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Offer Proof Instead of Promises to Land Your Next Job Quickly

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When you’re making an important buying decision, which do you prefer: someone making you a promise that the product will work for you or seeing proof that it meets you needs? If you’re like most people, you prefer proof. Here’s how to provide proof you fit a job during your next interview.

Scott WintripOffer Proof Instead of Promises to Land Your Next Job Quickly
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Four Important Answers to Jobseekers’ Most Pressing Questions

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Are you searching for your next role or know someone who is? There are four main questions being asked by people looking for their next opportunity. Without realizing it, they’re asking the wrong questions. Here are those four questions, the better ones to ask, and their answers.

Most Asked Question: Where can I find the best job opportunities?

A Better Question: How can I find the best companies to work for?

Answer: It’s important to remember that almost everyone has access to jobs posted online. While it’s okay to apply for these widely publicized job openings, you’re still competing with a huge crowd, and that lowers your chances for getting the position or even an interview.

Many of the best jobs can’t be found online or in print ads. In order to find truly great jobs, look for great organizations instead.

Find companies and leaders you believe are doing meaningful, and possibly even heroic work. To do this, search the Internet for press releases announcing how these companies are giving back to the community or embarking on other philanthropic quests. Chances are, if they care enough to give back, they’re also striving to take good care of their employees.

Most Asked Question: What’s the most important thing I should do during a job interview?

A Better Question: What’s the biggest dealbreaker during a job interview?

Answer: People always want to know what they should do to stand out during interviews. In this case, it’s what you shouldn’t do that’s most important. Simply put, don’t blab. Nothing turns off an interviewer more than a job candidate who loves the sound of his own voice.

Make it your practice to “say little, and ask a lot.” Asking great questions demonstrates your professionalism and intellect. And when it’s your turn to answer questions, follow the KISS principle—Keep It Short and Simple. This shows your ability to communicate succinctly and effectively.

Most Asked Question: What questions should I ask in an interview?

A Better Question: How can I fully engage during an interview?

Answer: Questions help you turn a potentially one-sided interview into a dialogue. When an interview feels like a conversation, you’ll be able to connect more with the leader, present your authentic self, and get rid of any jitters you may be feeling.

As the interview begins, without interrupting or being intrusive, ask the following question: “As we begin this interview, I’d love to know what objectives you have for our meeting.” This question demonstrates that you understand mutuality—a belief that both of you can and should benefit from your time together.

It’s also a good idea to take the responses of the hiring manager, and turn those into questions. For example, if she says, “Our top employees in this role aren’t afraid to take risks,” you could respond with “How has their willingness to take risks contributed to their success?” This question shows that you’re listening and allows you to have a more meaningful dialogue.

Most Asked Question: How can I impress an interviewer?

A Better Question: How can I best display my skills in an interview?

Answer: Remember, talk is cheap and seeing is believing. When an interviewer asks you a question about your skills, consider showing instead of telling. Experiential interviews—where candidates display their job skills—are rapidly replacing the old conventional interview template.

Here’s how to show your skills in an interview: If, for example, you’re interviewing for a sales role and the interviewer says, “Tell me how you go about selling to a prospective customer,” take this opportunity to show instead of tell. Suggest that you demonstrate a sales conversation, in which the interviewer plays the role of the prospective customer. This strategy provides an accurate reflection of your talent.

Finding a job you love comes down to tracking down the best organizations and then making lasting impressions during your interviews. Once you’ve updated the way you look at the whole process, you’ll be able to pursue the positions you really care about, and present yourself more accurately as the driven and capable employee you really are.

Scott WintripFour Important Answers to Jobseekers’ Most Pressing Questions
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