All posts tagged: Sales Flow

Don’t Be a Sales Schmuck

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageSlick lines, canned responses, and a voice that sounds just like the typical salesperson—a common combination for too many salespeople today. Even those who avoid this Wolf of Wall Street persona still tend to talk too much, listen too little, and dominate versus facilitate conversations with buyers. Is it any wonder that almost everyone, including salespeople themselves, dislike being on the receiving end of a sales pitch?

The definition of a schmuck is:

An obnoxious or contemptible person.

Even though many salespeople are far from the coercive schmucks portrayed in movies, most salespeople forget to ask themselves a critical question:

Would I want to be sold to by someone like me?

Chances are you’d find someone like you a little overbearing, at times, especially during those instances of the Verbal Vomit. Too much talking, even from the nicest salespeople, feels pushy and annoying. I know, I was one of them until I became a Sales Yogi, practicing Sales Flow instead of Sales Force.

Don’t be a Sales Schmuck. Say little, ask a lot. Hear people the way you’d want to be heard. Hold your tongue, showing buyers that you hold them in high regard. Don’t be forceful, be “flowful” as you facilitate conversations where the buyer sells his or herself on buying from you.

Always let the better closer close. Remember, it’s not you!

_____________________________

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Scott WintripDon’t Be a Sales Schmuck
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Death by Repetitive Practice

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageWhile some people may like the idea of death by chocolate, most would probably agree that killing the success of a business with ineffectual approaches is a really bad idea. Unfortunately, that’s what’s happening in many companies across the globe. While the use of Repetitive Practices in their businesses may not close the doors, they are hampering the achievement of their tremendous potential.

What is a Repetitive Practice? It is an inefficient method or routine that is often the way things have always been done. Repetitive practices are all too common and are the cause of or a contributor to most of the challenges faced by companies of all sizes.

How do you spot these? Watch for one or more of the following indicators:

  • A process that achieves less than the intended result.
  • Beloved or institutionally sacred methodologies that people fight to keep, even when these methods have lost their competitive edge.
  • Any routine that is complex, requiring constant reminders of what to do and how to do it.
  • A system, procedure, or course of action that people defend by saying, “But that’s the way it’s always been done.”
  • All ways of doing things that are the same after a maximum of two to three years (business and the market have evolved but processes lag behind).

A recent example involves a client in my Executive Advisor program that improved sales tenfold in just three months. Their repetitive practice of Sales Force, a sales process that attempts to control the client, was replaced by Sales Flow, a collaborative way of selling that engages the customer in selling themselves on buying. Sales Flow takes less effort, creates happier buyers, and is the current Innovative Practice that enrolls people in a more satisfying process for acquiring what they need and want. This increases sales, profits, customer satisfaction, and repeat business.

In order to achieve greater success without ridiculous amounts of effort, Repetitive Practices must be replaced with Best Practices and Innovative Practices (you can read more on how to innovate in my post Putting Lipstick on a Pig and Calling It Innovation).

Some leaders treat their companies, or aspects of them, as finished products versus living, breathing, evolving entities. I bet they’re the ones medicating themselves with chocolate instead meditating on better ways of doing business.

________________

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Scott WintripDeath by Repetitive Practice
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Engage in Sales Flow

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Many salespeople engage in a stop-start mentality in their sales practice. They start selling, land a few good prospects or customers, try to leverage them for all they are worth, then find themselves back at the beginning, having to start selling again. It’s little wonder that so many salespeople are not achieving continuous growth of a book of business.

In Sales Yoga we practice Sales Flow in how we sell, how we converse, and how we serve. For now, I’m going to focus on the first piece since, without it, there aren’t enough prospects with which to converse and serve.

One of the best examples of Sales Flow was demonstrated by Kerri, a senior sales manager at a multinational firm based on the East Coast. In advising her and her team on the principles of Sales Yoga, it was the need for Sales Flow that had the biggest impact. Kerri, in particular, was in the detrimental habit of stop-start selling. As she made the shift to Sales Flow, she found that the book of business she managed grew faster than ever, doubling in less than a year’s time.

Three of the keys to Kerri’s Sales Flow were as follows:

1. Instead of latching on to a few prospects at a time, she always had several dozen prospects at different stages of the process. “I never thought I could handle that much activity,” said Kerri, “but building my stamina for an increasing number of possibilities, using Sales Flow, was easier than I thought.”

2. Rather than assuming she had the best customers, she was always looking for better ones. “Now I pick and choose who to work with versus begging for business.”

3. When she thought she had made enough calls, had enough meetings, sent enough proposals, or closed enough business she always pushed for a little bit more. “Before engaging in Sales Flow, I used to sell myself short. Now I’m managing four times the amount of business in the same amount of hours. All because I got in the flow.”

To sell or not to sell is not the question.

How you sell is.

Sales Flow is the way to grow and stop-start selling has got to go.

Scott WintripEngage in Sales Flow
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To Sell or Not to Sell…That is NOT the Question

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“Yoga is almost like music in a way; there’s no end to it.” — Sting

Selling, like yoga, is almost like music as there is never an end to it, if it’s being done right. Yet, so many salespeople engage in a stop-start mentality in their sales practice. They start selling, land a few good prospects or customers, try to leverage them for all they are worth, then find themselves back at the beginning of having to start selling again. It’s little wonder that so many salespeople are not hearing the sweet music of consistent cash flow.

In Sales Yoga we practice Sales Flow in how we sell, how we converse, and how we serve. For now, I’m going to focus on the first piece since, without it, there aren’t enough prospects with which to converse and serve.

One of the best examples of Sales Flow was demonstrated by Kerri, a senior sales manager at a multinational firm based on the East Coast. In advising her and her team on the principles of Sales Yoga, it was the need for Sales Flow that had the biggest impact. Kerri, in particular, was in the detrimental habit of stop-start selling. As she made the shift to Sales Flow, she found that her book of business grew faster than ever, doubling in less than a year’s time.

Three of the keys to Kerri’s Sales Flow were as follows:

1. Instead of latching on to a few prospects at a time, she always had several dozen prospects at different stages of the process. “I never thought I could handle that much activity,” said Kerri, “but building my stamina for an increasing number of possibilities, using Sales Flow, was easier than I thought.”

2. Rather than assuming she had the best customers, she was always looking for better ones. “Now I pick and choose who to work with versus begging for business.”

3. When she thought she had made enough calls, had enough meetings, sent enough proposals, or closed enough business she always pushed for a little bit more. “Before engaging in Sales Flow, I used to sell myself short. I am now managing four times the amount of business in the same amount of hours. All because I got in the flow.”

To sell or not to sell is not the question.

How you sell is.

Sales Flow is the way to grow and stop-start selling has got to go.

Learn more about Sales Yoga

Scott WintripTo Sell or Not to Sell…That is NOT the Question
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