All posts tagged: StaffingU

Time Kills Brain Cells, Not Deals

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageIt’s been said that time is not on our side. The latest stats back this up. According to the Dice-DF Vacancy Duration Measure, time-to-fill has risen to its highest level in 15 years.

The problem is not capabilities, as there are more of those today than 15 years ago, especially the added efficiencies through technology. Nor is it available talent, as competent recruiters can always find someone to do the job.

The problem is process―most hiring managers (and their staffing and recruitment vendors, if they are using them) are not working a process that allows them to hire in an instant. Yet, these very same hiring managers can buy many things they want, when they want them, from services like iTunes, Amazon and GrubHub. Needs are always more important than wants, which makes this all-time high of time-to-fill even more baffling.

Time is clearly not on the side of anyone who recruits or hires. It makes people scared, scattered, scurried, and, sometimes, even stupid. Too much of it allows them to over-think and under-perform. This causes real harm as jobs go unfilled, backlogs increase, overtime grows, efficiencies plummet, customers complain and revenues and suffer.

Staffing and recruitment services, in particular, have a unique opportunity to make their buyers smarter by helping them engage in a nimble process where they get the talent they needed yesterday right now. There is lots of talk about differentiation amongst people in the staffing business; here’s one that’s not only distinct, different and powerful, but also solves the problem of out of control time-to-fill.

Scott WintripTime Kills Brain Cells, Not Deals
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Noise Canceling the Competition

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageCompetitive golfers and dancers keep their competition top of mind, knowing their influence can undermine them at any moment. Just the noise from these competitors can cause them to slice a drive or miss a step, creating a lost opportunity which ends up losing the match. The competition ends up stealing their trophies, their winnings and even their self-confidence and pride. The real power of these competitors comes from where they live—right between the ears. That’s why we often hear people saying they are competing with themselves, as they know that the only real competition, the thing that can get in their way, is their own thinking.

Just like these athletic professionals, competition for customers and candidates is not on the outside, but in our own competitive thinking. The other companies who provide similar services are not competitors, but merely potential distractions. What they do, how they do it, the price they charge and any games they play only matter if we let it.

There is enough noise that comes from the critic that lives in the human head. Isn’t it best not to add to the cacophony by simply ignoring what other people do?

“You can allow the noise from the competition to fade into the background. You can choose to act as if you were the market of one for the people you want to serve.” – Bernadette Jiwa, Marketing: A Love Story

Scott WintripNoise Canceling the Competition
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Leadership Powerups

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageIn almost every video game, there are special bonuses that convey advantages, such as more strength or firepower. These powerups can heal injuries, increase supremacy and accelerate a character’s ability to achieve the objectives and win a level or even the entire game.

Real-life powerups are available to leaders who foster interdependent relationships between all parties—managers, employees and co-workers. Interdependence creates a healthy dynamic where each individual does his or her part, versus a dependent relationship where one person, often the manager, shoulders all of the responsibility for making sure tasks are remembered and completed.

Powering up in this fashion requires:

  • Setting and communicating clear and reasonable expectations, since leaders are responsible for defining the objectives.
  • Instead of always telling people how to meet those expectations, asking instead how they plan to do it. Employees take greater ownership when they participate in determining how work gets done.
  • Once team members take responsibility for doing something, they keep it. Leaders undermine employees when they attempt to serve as their long-term memory.

True power as a leader comes not from how a manager wields authority, but in how he or she makes each person powerful by fostering personal responsibility, requiring people to keep doing the next right thing.

Scott WintripLeadership Powerups
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Effort is the Enemy

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageHiring managers typically need that empty seat filled yesterday, yet they often wait until tomorrow or a series of tomorrow’s before that happens. It is this very gap between yesterday and tomorrow that holds one of the greatest opportunities for staffing and recruiting firms.

The staffing industry can quickly elevate its reputation by more consistently providing talent on demand, right when it is needed. This not only delivers tremendous value; it is how firms can be rewarded with a more loyal constituency, a larger base of customers, and higher margins which are proportionate with the value being provided.

One key element standing in the way is effort. Agencies must recruit ahead, not behind, manufacturing the talent before it is needed. Buyers must be enrolled in a smarter process that allows them to acquire talent today, not tomorrow. Anything that causes delays, including resume submissions and interviews, must be eliminated and replaced with processes and guarantees that create a more nimble and responsive approach.

We live in an on demand, iTunes oriented, download it now society. To solve the needs of yesterday requires that staffing and recruitment vendors start acting today more like Netflix, Uber, and GrubHub. The alternative, perpetuating the status quo, will only further erode the already tenuous repetition of the industry.

Scott WintripEffort is the Enemy
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Achieving More by Doing Less – The Lean Approach to Success

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageWhile less is more is a popular statement, many people find that saying it is much easier than living and working in this manner. Achieving better sales, recruiting better talent, and being more effective as a leader requires doing less while focusing on always taking action on the next right thing.

Here are the three steps to create the space and focus needed to become a leaner and more proficient leader, salesperson, or recruiter:

  1. Identify which aspects of your job you are attempting to perform at or near perfection.
  2. Instead of investing the extra time on getting each item done perfectly, focus on just getting each of them right.
  3. Repeat as often as possible.

Perfection is overrated and often takes time away from getting other equally important things done. Focusing on success, not perfection, not only gets the job done, and done well, but allows for doing much more in much less time.

Scott WintripAchieving More by Doing Less – The Lean Approach to Success
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The Choice Between Effective or Defective Leadership

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageA leader need not be brilliant to be effective. Efficient leaders always do three things:

  1. Set clear and reasonable expectations.
  2. Succinctly communicate what is expected.
  3. Unwaveringly hold people accountable to these expectations.

These three behaviors, consistently executed, are the hallmarks of a simply effective leader. The difference between these individuals and those just getting by is the development and utilization of these traits regardless of market conditions.

Companies led in this manner create a culture that workers clamor to buy into and, in turn, they sell more and recruit better as a result of their belief in the organization and the accountability fostered within the system.

All three traits can be learned, honed, improved, and even mastered. Which means, effective versus defective leadership is a choice between continuous improvement or accelerating decline.

Which direction are your actions, or inaction, taking you?

 

Scott WintripThe Choice Between Effective or Defective Leadership
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Megavitamins for Customer Relationships

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The Verbal Vomit

It’s often said that salespeople should listen more than talk, however, those spouting this wisdom typically are the ones who continue to inundate those around them with voluminous amounts of words. In fact, most salespeople spew a stream of factoids, details, and feature-benefit chunks of information all over prospective clients.

No one likes to be thrown up on, and it’s certainly no way to start or grow an important relationship. Instead, our industry must adhere to a better standard:

Say little, ask a lot.

When you live by this rule, you always hear more while keeping the buyer engaged in a much more compelling conversation. Since the buyer always believes him or herself but only sometimes, if ever, believes you, you’re letting the better closer close. And, when you consistently conduct yourself in this manner, important comments you make are actually heard versus dismissed, since you’ve demonstrated that you share only important details.

Not only is this standard soothing to buyers, like a spoonful of Pepto Bismol, it’s also a mega-dose of vitamins that establishes and grows healthy, long-lasting partnerships.

Scott WintripMegavitamins for Customer Relationships
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Recruiting and Religion

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageRecruiting and religion share common ground—both require a reason to engage, a belief in what’s being offered, and a conversion experience.

Without a reason to fully engage, an individual is transient, easily swayed the next time something else catches his attention. He needs a reason to believe, be it in the spiritual practices of the religion, or in the promise a new job or assignment may hold.

When there is no belief, he is an imposter, only going through the motions. He may do this to placate a spouse who grew up with those religious beliefs, just as he may do in interviews, acting the part by answering questions, yet, only posing as a viable candidate, wasting the time of the hiring authority.

Without conversion, he becomes a spectator, appearing engaged, but never being fully committed. He will sit and listen to the minister, teacher, or imam, but he is only watching, not fully giving himself over to the experience. After appearing like a viable candidate who interviews well, he will decline an offer for an assignment or full-time job, resisting conversion to a new employment direction.

Redemption occurs when reason and belief lead to conversion, delivering him from previous circumstances into an opportunity for better conditions. The convert has a community and belief system to guide him towards an improved life experience. The candidate turned employee or contractor can now pursue a path that can provide more mental, emotional, and financial fulfillment each day.

While serving different purposes and varying audiences, religion and recruiting employ similar paths to move people to commit to something different or new. For that to work, it’s our job to ensure that reason, belief, and conversion are all present, otherwise, the only outcome will be wasted time and effort.

Religion and Recruiting

Scott WintripRecruiting and Religion
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