All posts tagged: trust

The Recipe for Loyalty – How Staffing and Recruitment Firms Can Gain and Keep Buyer Trust

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With a satisfaction score of -4%, the staffing industry has some work to do. In this podcast, Scott shares five ways to improve trust, reputations, and loyalty.

Scott WintripThe Recipe for Loyalty – How Staffing and Recruitment Firms Can Gain and Keep Buyer Trust
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Inspired Recruiting

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Scott's Monday Morning MessageSome interactions with candidates almost seem to be divinely inspired, while others feel like you’re trudging though mud and muck, getting nowhere fast. What’s the cause of these very different scenarios?

Inspired Recruiting, an almost effortless interaction with a candidate, always has two components: trust and compulsion. Without both of these, recruiting becomes a more difficult task.

Without trust and compulsion, you experience Shields Up, the recruiting equivalent of the shields in spaceships in science fiction. Candidates deploy a variety of shields to protect themselves from recruiters, especially when they feel mistrust or they lack a compelling need to speak with you. Trust must be built first before compulsion can move the conversation towards a mutually beneficial relationship where the needs of all parties are met.

If a candidate can benefit from what you do and trusts you, yet, doesn’t feel an irresistible urge to pursue your opportunity, you have someone who is just going through the motions. He feels good, you feel good, yet these good feelings are doing nothing to benefit either of you long term. In order for a trusting candidate to gain the compulsion to pursue what’s being offered, the recruiter must engage a collaborative dialogue where the candidate sells himself on buying into the job or assignments at hand.

You get a resistant candidate when she has a need to make a change but doesn’t fully trust you or your company. Time, energy, and effort to build trust are the next course of action.

Trust and healthy compulsions are each, in and of themselves, valuable commodities. In combination, they create an alchemy that produces golden results for everyone. The task of every recruiter who wants to make more lasting matches is to ensure that both elements are part of every relationship.

Scott WintripInspired Recruiting
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The Inspired Sale

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Some interactions with customers almost seem to be divinely inspired, while others feel like you’re trudging though mud and muck, getting nowhere fast. What’s the cause of these very different scenarios?

The Inspired Sale, one in which the buyer feels a compelling need to buy and buy from you, always has two components: trust and compulsion. Without both of these, selling becomes a difficult, if not impossible task.

Without trust and compulsion, you experience Shields Up, the sales equivalent of the shields in spaceships in science fiction. Buyers deploy ten different shields to protect themselves from a sales pitch, especially when they don’t trust you nor feel a compelling need to buy from you, even when they have a need you can fulfill. Trust must be built first before compulsion can move the conversation towards a mutually beneficial relationship where the needs of all parties are met.

If a buyer can benefit from what you do and trusts you, yet, doesn’t feel an irresistible urge to buy, you have someone who is just going through the motions. He feels good, you feel good, yet these good feelings are doing nothing to benefit either of you long term. In order for a trusting buyer to gain the compulsion to buy, the salesperson must engage a collaborative dialogue where the buyer sells himself on buying and buying now.

You get a resistant buyer when she has a need to buy but doesn’t trust you enough to buy from you and your company. Time, energy, and effort to build trust are the next course of action.

Trust and healthy compulsions to buy are each, in and of themselves, valuable commodities. In combination, they create an alchemy that produces golden results for everyone. The task of every salesperson who wants to sell more is to ensure that both elements are part of every relationship.

Learn more about the ten shields buyers deploy and how to get them to engage Shields Down. Buy your copy of Sales Yoga today.

Scott WintripThe Inspired Sale
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Building Unconditional Customer Loyalty

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This past weekend I had the pleasure of being with my wife as she watched her beloved alma mater, Ohio State, beat Michigan in their yearly football matchup. While it’s been several decades since Holly sat in the stands cheering on her team as a student, you would’ve thought it was just yesterday as she hooted, hollered, and even dropped a few choice expletives. She is consistently passionate and loyal for everything Ohio State, regardless of whether they win or lose. Collegiate teams, and even many professional sports franchises, serve as models for creating experiences that enroll people in inviolable attachment, win or lose.

Imagine if your company had that type of loyalty from customers. In spite of occasional failings and shortfalls, they stick by you, your relationship transcending any one transgression or problem. Such loyalty is not only possible, it should be the goal of every business of every size. To achieve this, your organization must employ T-V-A:

  1. Trust: Make promises that are ALWAYS kept.
  2. Value: Provide value customers need along with value they didn’t know they couldn’t live without.
  3. Amends: While you must never fall short on promises, mistakes will happen. Own them, without making excuses, and while making things right use it as an opportunity to deepen your relationship with the client.

Most companies fall short in one or more of these areas at least some of the time. As a leader, it’s your job to ensure this never, ever happens. Yes, this is about perfection, and these three areas can be done perfectly as they are completely within your control if the appropriate processes are in place. If your customers trust that everything you promise will be delivered and if they receive anticipated and unanticipated value, the mistakes, as long as they do not happen often and are handled well, are quickly forgotten. Just like last week’s loss by your favorite team is ancient history, the next time they win, your clients will always be cheering you on as you build and sustain trust, deliver tremendous value, and make amends, as needed.

Scott WintripBuilding Unconditional Customer Loyalty
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